Jokes And Puns You Will Only Laugh At If You Have Knowledge About Different Languages.

Your ability to speak different languages, or at least know a little bit about them, comes in handy sometimes. Besides the cognitive advantages that come with speaking different languages, this ability also gives you unique insights into other cultures, it allows you to communicate with a wide array of beautifully different people, and you could also use it to overhear conversations about you in a different language. Most importantly, when you know other languages your humor repertoire expands. You develop the necessary knowledge to understand jokes, memes, and puns from different cultures. In this article, we have combined a list of jokes that are only accessible to people who know a bit about different languages. If you are one of these people, the following jokes will make your day.


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49 thoughts on “Jokes And Puns You Will Only Laugh At If You Have Knowledge About Different Languages.”

  1. I’m sorry but I’ am Slovak and and we never say ” tractor is falling”. I think someone did mistake because this was in another article and also it wasn’t true. When ” it’s raining cats and dogs”, we say : it’s raining like from watering can.”

    1. They might have mistaken it with Czech because we literally say: “Tractors are falling” (= Padají trakaře).

    2. Perhaps it depends on the region you’re from…? I’m from western Slovakia and ‘tractors are falling’ is used and/or understood by everyone I know, as is the watering can reference. It’s right up there with the likes of ‘wet as a mouse’ – another expression which takes a bit of explaining 🙂

    3. In Bulgarian is the same: it’s raining like from watering can (vali kato iz vedro) 🙂

  2. In Dutch the birth control pill is just called ‘the pill’
    I guess all other pills don’t matter! ?

      1. In France too, we usually say « la pillule ». Shortcut for « pillule contraceptive », not « pillule anti-bébé ».

        Pils is just a kind of light beer, originally from the region of Pilsen, Czech Republic. It is a low fermentation beer and should be made with “Saaz”, a czech hop. Very often pils is just a synonym for (cheap) lager.

        1. In Finnish, “pillule” means literally “for the pussy”, if you’ll pardon my French.

          1. “Pillulle” is the correct spelling … but this form is never-ever used in any conversations. I’d call it a synthetic word – it exists, but only on paper.

    1. That took me a second, too, but if you look closer, they’re each adjusted slightly, while the majority of the letters from 8 are still there, hence the comparison/similarity

    1. unless you are French-speaking Walloon nd you say “ottante” and “nonante”

      1. In Belgium, they only have septante (70) and nonante (90). However some part of Switzerland and French Jura however use huitante (80) or octante (80) (and all Switzerland uses septante and nonante).

  3. There is a spelling error in 27: “Memeber”.
    And the pathos is not the right one.
    It should be even more pathetic…

    1. 姦 means adultery, not noise. Still quite an accurate representation, from a male perspective at least.

      1. Google translate says it means:

        Translations of 姦

        evil
        邪惡, 邪, 壞, 姦, 誹謗, 否
        treacherous
        姦詐, 姦邪, 姦, 陰險, 姦險, 姦猾

        traitor
        叛徒, 叛逆者, 背叛者, 姦, 叛變, 賊
        illicit sexual relations
        苟合, 姦淫, 姦
        liaison
        聯絡, 私通, 姦, 連音

  4. Regarding no 26, I think that the common thread is that all of the languages are Indo European. I understand that ‘eight’ is derived from PIE *okto and ‘night’ is derived from PIE *nekwt. The similarity in the starting point leads to a similarity in the end points.

  5. A french woman and an english man are in bed .
    She says. ” Je t ‘adore ! ”
    “Shut the door yourself ” he replies .

  6. It is not only Arabic – but in Polish we also may say that : “The bus ran away from me.” or “My leg broke itself”. 🙂

    I also think about some funny Polish words and phrases that may be connected with other languages… Of course the first ones were a bit improper :).

    I did not get some of jokes, but many was funny for me, as I know Polish, English, Russian and know basics of Portuguese, Spanish, French and German.

  7. What English vegetable do you get by putting a Cantonese rabbit on either side of a Cantonese horse?
    A tomato (Rabbit=To, Horse=Ma)

  8. One or two of these were funny. Most were pathetic.

    Incidentally, for most of them you don’t need to know the other language at all. Mistitled.

    Language Nerds is the pits.

  9. No 10 – Perhaps “Could of” might have also been intended as “Kind of”

  10. In the event of a major thunderstorm, the Hungarians would say: “old women are falling from the sky” (vénasszonyok potyognak az égből).

  11. I end my telephone conversations in german with “Auf Wiederhören”.
    One of my english speaking staffmembers asked me after weeks :
    “Why do you tell everone on the phone your feet are hurtin’ ?”

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