What deaf people say about the language they think in.

What language do deaf people think in? This is a tough question to answer. Aside from the science behind what language deaf people think in and whether this question can be answered or not,  there is a better way we can gain a clear insight into this. Why not ask deaf people themselves? Michele Westfall is our best candidate. Michele was born deaf, had hearing parents, and has deaf children. When she was asked what language do deaf people think in, she beautifully replied:

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Here is why we say Tick Tock, Flip-Flop, and Hip Hop, But not Tock Tick, Flop-Flip, or Hop Hip.

Have you ever wondered why we say tick-tockKing-Kong, and flip-flop? And why do kong-king and tock-tick sound so awkward to our ears? Why is it fiddle-faddle and pitter-patter rather than faddle-fiddle and patter-pitter? Why?…well ’cause! It turns out that this is one of the unwritten rules that English native speakers know, but don’t know they know. I will unravel this amazing rule here for you. Please bear with me.

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Major differences between American and British English.

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Americans and their British neighbors may share a language, but that doesn’t mean they speak exactly the same version of it. There are many unsubtle differences between British and American English that make each one unique, from small spelling changes to entirely different words for common concepts. GrammarCheck ingeniously illustrated these differences in a beautiful infographic that we brought to your fingertips.  Check it out and share with us any other differences you think the infographic left out. Enjoy! 

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The Evolution of The Alphabet: From 1750 BC to Today.

The Alphabet of the English language and most of the European languages was not thought of at the spur of the moment. Like the case with most language phenomenon, it naturally evolved through centuries of accumulating changes that gave us the Alphabet as we know it today. 

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50 Awfully Good Oxymorons.

An oxymoron is a figure of speech in which two or more words side by side contradict each other. Their use in speech often leads to humor, irony, and sarcasm.  We’ve asked our followers at The Language Nerds to share their favorite oxymorons and the result has been nothing short of hilarious. We’ve compiled them here for you and added some more and we hope they appeal to you. Have a good read! 

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20 Fascinating Words with no English Equivalent.

No language has all of the words, and English is no exception. While you can express the complex feeling of “insecurity, fear, concern, and envy over relative lack of possessions, status or something of great personal value, particularly in reference to a comparator, a rival, or a competitor.” with one word (i.e. jealousy), some other very simple concepts need to be expressed with more than one word, like the day after tomorrow. With input from our amazing followers at The Language Nerds, we have compiled a list of some of the most interesting words that exist in other languages but have no equivalent in English. You really don’t want to miss any of them. 

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The story of the Wug that not every language​ nerd is familiar with.

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A wug is an imaginary cartoon creature created and first used by psycholinguist Jean Berko Gleason to test people’s ability to use the English plural morpheme*. The test usually involves two cartoon panels—one depicting one wug with the caption “This is a wug,” and the other depicting two wugs with the caption “Now there is another one. There are two of them. There are two ____.”

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Babies start learning language in womb, studies reveal.

How we learn and use language is a miraculous feat that science knows so little about. Babies use language meticulously at a very young age.  It could come up as surprising that babies have any contact with the outside world before they are born, but new evidence came to light which suggests that babies can hear noises from inside the womb. Not just that, they are actively involved in learning the sounds of the language their mothers speak. So, in a way, language learning starts in the womb, well before than previously thought. Now let’s break this down in more detail. 

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Fascinating facts about the world’s languages.

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Languages are interesting and beautiful, warts and all. There is not a single language in the world that is not associated with exquisite beauty and outstanding expressive potential.  It is true that we still don’t know a lot about the languages of the world, like from where did they originate or why are they the way they are, but we know a fair amount of stuff about them to entertain ourselves with. So, let’s see some interesting facts about the world’s languages in this infographic that was brought to you by TakeLessons.com.

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