54 Clever Illustrations of Words That Sound The Same But Have Different Meanings.

I’m pretty sure you’ve heard of homophones before. They’re those words that are pronounced the same way but have different meanings and spellings, and this is why they confuse a lot of people. But homophones can be fun sometimes and because of them, we have jokes like this: What happens when a frog’s car breaks down? It gets toad away. If you think this is funny, you will definitely enjoy the treat we have prepared for you in this article. Bruce Worden is someone who is particularly interested in homophones and decided to make things simple for everyone. He created Homophones Weekly for the sole purpose of cleverly illustrating homophones in such an amusing way that everyone will not only enjoy but also get a perfect grasp of these confusing words. 


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11 thoughts on “54 Clever Illustrations of Words That Sound The Same But Have Different Meanings.”

  1. Interesting. I don’t pronounce loose and lose the same way, however! Must be regional

  2. Some are subtle, but several of these are not pronounced the same if you are a careful speaker: 5, 9, 15, 22, 34, 38, 45, 53. Sometimes the accent makes the difference: desert carries the accent on the first syllable, while dessert is accented on the second. Please note: I didn’t look in the dictionary!

    1. Desert as a verb (to desert the army) is accented on the second syllable, just like dessert. Ur getting mixed-up with desert the noun (a hot, dry place) which is accented on the first syllable.

      1. Yes, good point!
        – de’-sert: a dry place
        – de-sert’: to abandon one’s post
        – de-ssert’: a sweet dish eaten after a meal

        It’s never easy.

  3. Of course this is not a complete list,
    Off the Top of my head I can think of : two (the number), to (a place), too (also)…
    Four (number), for…
    lead (an army), lead (a lump of metal)

    1. Lead is not a homophone. The lump of metal is pronounced as a short e, as in get. The verb lead (an army) is pronounced as a long e, as in seem. So it is a homograph, same spelling but different pronuncation. However, lead (short e) and led are homophones, same sound but different spelling.

  4. Such basic confusions of different words with same sounds are often dismissed as trivial ,yet they can bring a sea of semantic difference if they are not in place.
    It’s a great pack of information and we’ll presented for learning -teaching situations.

  5. Point 51 is not correct. Lightening is the present participle of Lighten. It should be lighting and lightning.

  6. I don’t think anybody actually pronounces them the same. That should no be on the list.

  7. I’m not sure non-native speakers will pronounce it same 🙂
    But they can pronounce as same another different words 🙂

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