58 Differences Between British And American English That Still Confuse Everyone.

To be honest, it’s starting to feel like British English and American English are not the same language anymore. To quote George Bernard Shaw, the United States of America and the UK are “two countries divided by a common language.” They can still understand each other, but the marked differences between the two varieties are growing steadily with each generation that in a few years they are going to be mutually unintelligible. One of the most notable and confusing differences, besides pronunciation, is at the level of vocabulary.¬†Grammar Check¬†visualized these differences in a beautiful infographic that we broke down here for you. Have a good read ?


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7 thoughts on “58 Differences Between British And American English That Still Confuse Everyone.”

  1. Well, actually they call defense attorneys solicitors. Barristers are high-powered attorneys who defend the accused in the higher courts. There are no equivalents in the US to barristers.

  2. To elaborate on that last one: the Scottish spelling is Whisky and the Irish spelling is Whiskey

  3. Never thought about that Postman Pat is working at Royal Mail… And hence delivers the post and not the mail…

  4. “Whisky” if it’s made in Scotland; “Whiskey” if it’s made anywhere else: that’s the usual Scottish classification.

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