People Are Sharing hilarious Literal Translations, And Here Are 25 Of The Best Ones.

Have you ever thought beyond your language when it comes to what words literally mean and what they can be translated to word-for-word? It’s just fun, like anything multilingual. We brought to you today some of the most hilarious literal translations from all across the languages of the world to give you a sense of how beautiful languages can be. Don’t forget to share your favorite and if you have other examples, do kindly share them. ?


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23 thoughts on “People Are Sharing hilarious Literal Translations, And Here Are 25 Of The Best Ones.”

    1. No, it’s not the cow ” if ” but the cow “of” = Our Rabbi Moses’ cow. By the way, lady bug is American English. In British English it’s lady bird.

  1. I have another comment to make. When I was in France, many, many years ago, I wanted to buy a bra but I didn’t know what it was called. I finally went up to someone, and using my hands, asked in French how one says. “something that a woman wears here”, pointing to my chest. The answer was: “soutien gorge” . The literal translation=supports the throat! I never knew that my bust was that high up.

    1. “Gorge” in French also translates to “chest”, although it is more of a 19th century meaning.

  2. Lady bug.

    Brazilian : little Joane.

    English: We’re doomed!
    Brazilian: the cow went to the swamp.

    English: your plan didn’t work out well.

    Brazilian: your plan gave with donkeys on the water.

  3. In Hungarian we also say lying policeman for a speed bump. I was kind of disappointed that you didn’t include our language there. Great compilation though.

  4. The Norwegian word for butterfly=sommerfugl
    translates literally as “summer bird”
    And ladybug=marihøne
    is “Mary’s chicken” (or even “a chicken named Mary”)
    Television=fjernsyn
    lit. “far sight” (which really applies to the the English word too), BUT a possible literal translation of “television” into Norwegian is “sights of frozen earth.”

  5. I am fluent in Croatian but never ever heard that ladybug would be “god’s little sheep”. Never.
    Rather, “Mary bug” (bubamara).

  6. In Russian speed bump would also be “lying policeman”. And ladybug is “God’s little COW”! Nice!)

    1. Same in Polish!:)
      Speed bump-leżący policjant
      Lady bird – święta krówka (though it’s a folk name, most often it’s called ‘biedronka’)

  7. A number of languages associate scallops with St. James, since according to the Bible he carried one or something.

  8. English: backache
    French: kidney pain

    Furthermore, in the song “Je t’aime moi non plus”Jane Birkin exhorts Serge Gainsbourg to “enter” between her kidneys. Quite a performance.

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